GeoKone 0.99.033 Released :: Fullscreen Support

http://GeoKone.NET has been updated! Now with Fullscreen Support!!

I made a video also, showing how to create geometry live with GeoKone. Watch in fullscreen and HD !

Release Notes

  • Fullscreen support For Firefox & Chrome, Safari 6.x works but no keyboard support in fullscreen
  • Load Shared Scenes: Navigate to “Scene/Load Shared Scenes” and you can find some example scenes there to play around with. For now, I have added 9 scenes there manually, in future releases you can also share your scenes to others!
  • Formation locator, shows visually what formation is active when you joggle them
  • Save and Load animation settings, opacity, tracing and animating. Scenes now start animating automatically when loaded, if saved while animating.

For full list of changes, see the ChangeLog.

Also I really recommend you to use Firefox with GeoKone.NET. Currently it is the fastest and most reliable browser out there, at least based on my experience working with Safari, Chrome and Firefox on the Mac Os X platform.

Create Geometry! Raise Your Awareness!

Now go to http://www.GeoKone.NET and create Sacred Geometry! Creating Sacred Geometry can have a positive effect on your understanding of things!

Programming Sacred Geometry: Understanding the Circle

How does one go about programming and understanding Sacred Geometry ? This is what I want to know, and am in the process of doing, so I might as well as try to explain my learning process to others too.

This can be pretty basic stuff if you know anything about graphics programming, but for those who are still starting their graphics programming careers this is all stuff that has to be understood in order to create more interesting patterns :) Also, many tutorials focus on the technological and mathematical side of things, I like to focus on actually understanding  and explaining what happens behind the process. So, here is the first part, hope you enjoy :)

Understanding the Circle

Basically it all comes down to understanding this picture:

Drawing a Circle using sin and cosine functions

Drawing a Circle using sine and cosine functions

How to create and draw a circle is the basic corner of sacred geometry everywhere. Drawing or creating a perfect circle manually without using any tools is very dfficult. This is something that builders all around the world know. But we must have been able to draw circles before inventing a computer or without using drawing compass to achieve it, so how would one go on doing something like this ?

The key is to figure out how would an human create a circle, because this way of thinking comes natural to us. We are not computers or calculators, so radians and degrees and whatnot can get confusing.

Humans are good in facing and understanding the Four Cardinal Directions and halving distances between two points. These things come naturally to us, so it’s best to use natural methods to learn things.

This way we can always think of the process of how to do it, and not just memorize equations that are full of strange symbols (which is btw the most common method taught in schools.. memorize stuff you are being told, understand later if you care to make the effort… or in the rare cases where the teacher is dedicated enough and loves the subject, you might even get a good explanation of How Things Work actually)

Anyway, I like to use the sticks and ropes analogy, as it is easy to understand and visualize. This is how to draw a circle using only two sticks and a piece of rope:

Drawing a Circle using sticks and ropes

Drawing a Circle using sticks and ropes

  1. Place one stick where you would like your circle to be. This is called the Origo.
  2. Figure out how big you want the circle to be, and cut a piece of rope accordingly. This will define the width of half of the circle, or the Radius.
  3. Tie the rope to the stick in the origo and connect another stick to the loose end of the rope
  4. Mark all the Four Directions around the origo with this newly connected stick, facing North, East, South and West and placing a mark at the distance of the rope. These are called Co-ordinate Points.
  5. Split the distance in half between any two co-ordinate points and mark another point with the rope from the Origo here to get more accurate circle
  6. Continue this until you have a enough points to form an approximation of the circle

Now that we have computers that know how to calculate angles using the sine and cosine functions, we can draw fairly accurate circles without even understanding how it works.

But if one does not understand how the small things work, understanding the big picture and creating something natural that just works becomes really difficult. It can become a practice of remembering illogical patterns, equations and symbols, trying out all the different combinations to reach some kind of answer that seems logical, without understanding what happens in the process.

This is why it’s so important in actually understanding the natural functionality of things, what do these symbols actually represent in nature, not just what kind of human invented terms are attached to them. To see behind the equations and beyond :)

In the next part I will actually show how to program a circle and some other shapes using this understanding. Whee!